Comparing Two Of The Best Android Phones Today – The Sony Xperia S And The Samsung Galaxy S2

We are all lucky to have witnessed the release of the Sony only brand handset the Sony Xperia S this year. We are also all lucky to have been graced with one of the most powerful and best-selling smartphone to date, and I am talking about the Samsung Galaxy S2. In this article, we will try to pit two of these handsets against each other. In short, I will try to compare them and tell you why they both deserve your attention. Read on!

Let us now talk about their displays. Let us start with the Xperia S. It packs a 4.3″ LED backlit LCD touch screen with a resolution of 720 x 1280 pixels with a pixel density of 342 ppi. The Galaxy S2 on the other hand, packs the same screen size (4.3″) but uses the Super AMOLED Plus display technology. It comes in with a resolution of 480 x 800 pixels and a pixel density of 217 ppi. As you can see, the Xperia S bags the title for packing a powerful screen resolution and clearer pixel density at 342 ppi. But on the other hand, the Galaxy S2 is packed with Super AMOLED Plus screen display. Between the two handsets, they are both capable of delivering smooth graphics and vivid screen colors. In short, they are both winners in this category.

Let us now move on their processors. Again, we are starting off with the Xperia S. It is packed with a powerful dual-core processor using Qualcomm MSM8260 Snapdragon chipset. It clocks at an amazing speed of 1.5GHz. On the other hand, the Galaxy S2 packs the same dual-core processor. The only difference is that it clocks at 1.2GHz only and it used Exynos chipset. If you look at the numbers, the difference is not that huge. They are still known for bearing the same powerful dual-core processing prowess.

Moving on, let us now talk about their cameras. And again, let me start with the Xperia S. It is packed with a powerful 12MP shutter with resolution of 4000 x 3000 pixels. It can record videos at 1080 pixels and at 30 frames per second (fps). It boasts a 1.3MP front-facing shutter with a resolution of 720 pixels and can shoot at 30 frames per second (fps). The Galaxy S2 comes in with 8MP shutter with resolution of 3264 x 2448 pixels and can shoot videos at 1080 pixels at 30 frames per second (fps). It packs a 2MP front-facing shutter. Now, it is quite obvious that Sony bags the title for better and powerful primary camera. Samsung on the other hand, wins the title for better front-facing camera.

Both of these handsets originally shipped with Android Gingerbread. However, the Galaxy S2 is now upgradable to the latest Android Iteration the Ice Cream Sandwich. On the other hand, the Xperia S is still waiting for its Ice Cream Sandwich upgrade. Another point goes to Samsung for getting the much awaited Ice Cream Sandwich update ahead of Sony.

If you look at the main features of these handsets, it is not that quite hard to believe why they are so famous and loved right now. They have the processing prowess that mobile phone users are into right now. They also have good shutters that we all use on a daily basis.

This is the end of my comparison note. This is my version of comparing two of the best Android handsets today, the Sony Xperia S and the Samsung Galaxy S2.

Find the Best Android Phones – 3 Tips to Help You Choose the Top Phone for You!

There are dozens upon dozens of different Android smartphones on the market. With so much variety, it can be very difficult to decide which is the best one for you. Each phone has its own features, specifications, and software which separates it from the others. So before you go out and purchase your next Android phone, keep these tips in mind so that you can find the phone that’s right for you!

1. How new of a phone do you need?

There are different versions of the Android operating system available for phones. The most recent version is Android 4.0 “Ice Cream Sandwich” which runs on the new Samsung Galaxy Nexus. Most of the other premium phones run Android 2.3 and cheaper devices run even earlier versions. When you’re looking for your next cellphone, be aware of which OS version it runs. If you only need the basics and plan on running normal applications, then you don’t need the most up-to-date version. However, if you plan on using large and intensive apps, then look for a device that has one of the most recent versions of Android.

2. What should you pay?

Smartphones can easily cost anywhere from $80 to $800. If you decide to get an older device with a two-year cellphone contract, then they are often times free or very cheap. However, the newer phones, even with a contract, can still cost you about $200+. If you don’t use your phone too often for anything more than talking or texting, then a free phone with a 2 year contract OR a low-price “$100 deal” with no contract are fine for you. If you know that you’re going to use tons of data and applications, then you’ll want one that costs a little more.

3. Should you even by a new phone?

If you already have an Android device, then you may not need to go out and buy a new one. Many of the older models may work just as well for everything that you need to do. If your current phone hasn’t had any problems, then there’s no need to upgrade. However, if your current phone isn’t adequate for what you need to do or if it’s not a true smartphone you should definitely consider upgrading.

Conclusion

The good news is that Android phones are becoming less and less expensive every day. Finding the best one for you doesn’t necessarily mean you need to spend a ton of money. Just make sure that you remember the above tips when you start shopping. You don’t want to waste money on a phone that you don’t need but you also don’t want to be disappointed by a phone that can’t do what you need it to do. It’s important to know what you’re buying and how you’re going to use it!

Secrets To The Best Android Phones From Verizon

Of the thirteen Verizon Android phones the The HTC ThunderBolt is currently their premier phone. Other popular Verizon Androids are the Motorola’s Droid 2 and the HTC Droid Incredible 2. However, these two phones don’t sport the 4G connectivity, while the ThunderBolt does.

From a physical point of view the ThunderBolt is fairly heavy (6.4 ounces) and large (4.8 x 2.6 x 0.5 inches HWD). For some this is not an issue and gives the phone a solid premier feel, but if you like a phone that fits lightly in your pocket this one might not be for you. The display screen is an impressive 4.3 Inches (800 x 480 pixels), giving you crisp viewing even at obscure angles. There is a 1.3 megapixel front facing camera for video calling and a powerful 8 megapixel rear camera with dual-LED flash. The real aspect that puts this phone ahead of the Droid 2 and Droid Incredible 2 is the connectivity speed – the ThunderBolt is now running on Verizon’s 4G LTE network. Verizon’s rapid 4G network is new and already covers a large number of the major metropolitan areas.

For almost all the smartphones you are required to select the $30 data plan, giving you unlimited data, and there is no extra cost if you are running on 4G versus 3G. A neat option is to get WiFi hotspot, this $20 add-on allows you to connect up to eight devices, such as your laptop, to your phone’s internet so you always have internet on the go. The flip side to having such quick browsing speeds is that your battery probably will not last you more than two and half hours of 4G use. This has raised a lot of questions as to the functionality of the phone. However, on 3G you can expect to get around eight hours of talk time. Which by all accounts is very reasonable. The reality is you are likely to have trouble getting through the day without recharging. For a high pace corporate individual this might not be the right phone for you, but if you want to dazzle your friends with the fastest internet speeds then this one is for you.

You are likely to find the phone quick to maneuver through apps and day-to-day use with the 1 GHz Snapdragon processor, and Android 2.2 (Froyo) operating system. Unfortunately, the Thunderbolt does not ship with the latest Android version (Gingerbread, 2.3). However, it is expected to have an official upgrade sometime this Summer, with unofficial version online for users that have rooted their handset. Note, Android has blocked users with rooted devices from using the movie rental options. The phone ships with 2.5 MB of built in memory and a 32 SDmicro card – more than enough room to store all your pictures and videos.

To sum things up, the Thunderbolt is Verizon’s premier phone. It is a better option for you even if you do not have access to the 4G network than the Droid X, merely because the interface from HTC (Sence) has better functionality than Motorola’s MotoBlur. If you are toying with the iPhone, don’t. It does not have the 4G connectivity, and nor will the iPhone 5, soon to be called iPhone 4S. The Droid 2 might be an option to consider if you prefer having a physical keyboard (much improved keyboard from the original Droid). If not, stick with the Thunderbolt and hope that the next generation smartphone’s have better battery efficiencies.